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Stats For User 'GayGeek'

You are viewing sample data (the data for the developer of this site). If you were a logged in user, you would see your own data.

View: Weight Body Fat Body Fat Segmented Lean Mass Body Measurements Muscle Measurements Muscle Segmented Waist/Hip Ratio Waist/Chest Ratio

Weight is directly related to BMI, but not as important as % Body Fat or Waist/Hip Ratio which indicate whether the person is over or under weight.

S3X Fitness tracks three important body measurement:

  • Butt - The measurement around the largest part of your butt. This is used to calculate the Waist/Hip Ratio.
  • Belly - The measurement around the largest part of your belly. Will probably be at/near your belly button. People who are trying to lose abdominal fat will want to watch this measurement.
  • Waist - The measurement around the smallest part of your waist. Typically this occurs about half way between the bottom of your rib cage and the top of your hip bone. This is not the measurement around where your jeans sit on your hips! Waist is used to calculate your Waist/Hip Ratio.

Don't worry too much if your lastest measurement is too high or too low. The measurements will naturally fluctuate. Your goal is just to get the trend line going in the right direction. To do that you need more dots on the "right" side of the trend line than on the "wrong" side.

S3X Fitness tracks 4 or 5 other measurements for members who are trying to build muscle:

  • Forearms - The measurement around the largest part of your forearm (while flexing). The forearm is often neglected, but big forearms are hot!
  • Biceps - The measurement around the largest part of your bicep (while flexing). The triceps play a big role in this measurement as well, but they're not what are being flexed.
  • Chest (Men Only) - The measurement around the largest part of your chest while flexing your pecs. This measurement is used to calculate your Waist/Chest Ratio.
  • Quads - The measurement around the largest part of your upper leg (while flexing) – usually right at your groin.
  • Calves - The measurement around the largest part of your calf muscle (while flexing).

One interesting thing is that in many men Biceps = Calves = Neck. So to be "well-proportioned" you should shoot for the bicep and calf lines shown above to be very close to each other.

And don't worry too much if one of your lastest measurements is too high or too low. The measurements will naturally fluctuate. Your goal is just to get the trend line going in the right direction. To do that you need more dots on the "right" side of the trend line than on the "wrong" side.

Segmented body fat scales give a much clearer picture of where the fat is in your body. Unfortunately, with the exception of liposuction, there's no way to target fat loss in a particular part of your body. Working out an area, doesn't increase fat loss in that area (at least not any more than fat loss elsewhere).

If you think data is missing in the graph, it's probably because it overlaps with the data for the same body part on the other side of the body. For example, left arm may cover up the data for right arm.

Segmented body fat scales typically give details on the muscle mass you have in different parts of your body. This is useful if you're trying to build particular muscles. Realize that some of the values above have been divided to make the graph tighter and better able to show trends.

If you think data is missing in the graph, it's probably because it overlaps with the data for the same body part on the other side of the body. For example, left arm may cover up the data for right arm.

The information in these charts is based on 34 body stats records.

Changes Over Time

(Changes compared to the two week
period ending 2019-02-27)
1 month 3 months 6 months 9 months 1 year 2 years 3 years
Weight 1.6 lbs 1.8 lbs 2.7 lbs -0.8 lbs -6.1 lbs -22.1 lbs -19 lbs
BMI 0.2 0.2 0.4 -0.1 -0.8 -3 -2.6
Waist/Hip Ratio -0.02 -0.03 -0.03 -0.02 -0.02 -0.05
Body Fat -0.3 lbs 1.4 lbs 2.1 lbs -0.2 lbs -3.8 lbs -17.2 lbs -16.4 lbs
Lean Mass 1.9 lbs 0.4 lbs 0.6 lbs -0.6 lbs -2.3 lbs -4.8 lbs -2.6 lbs
Muscle 1.7 lbs 0.2 lbs 0.5 lbs -0.6 lbs -2.3 lbs -4.7 lbs -2.6 lbs
Butt 0.6" 0.2" 0.1" 0.2" 3.5" 0.6"
Belly -0.6" -0.2" -0.8" -0.6" -1.1" -3.9"
Waist -0.5" -0.9" -1.2" -0.6" -1.1" -3.7"
Forearms -0.1" 0.1" 0" -0.4" -0.2" -0.6"
Biceps/Triceps -0.1" -0.1" -0" -0.5" -0.5" -1.3"
Chest -0.6" -0.5" 0.2" -0" -0.9" -2.8"
Upper Thighs 0.3" 0.1" -0.3" -0.2" -0.4" -1.1"
Calves 0.1" -0.2" -0.2" 0.1" -0" -0.3"
Waist/Chest Ratio -0 -0.01 -0.03 -0.01 -0.01 -0.03

The data shown in the table above is calculated by taking averages from the past 15 days and comparing them to the averages from periods 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year ago. If there are anomalous readings during any of those periods they can affect the results shown above. This is why we suggest taking things like body measurements at least every week. From our perspective, the more data we have the better – it makes the averages more accurate.

GayGeek's "Daily Caloric Need"

If you're trying to lose weight you need to take in fewer calories than your body burns. And people who are thin need to make sure that they eat enough to ensure their body doesn't start burning muscle. So it's important to know how many calories your body will burn in a typical day. That's called your "Daily Caloric Need" and it's based on your "Basal Metabolic Rate" (aka "Resting Metabolic Rate"). There are a number of formulas to determine BMR – all of which are educated guesses for the average person:

Activity Level How Many Calories GayGeek's Body Burns Per Day
Mifflin St Jeor Katch-McArdle
(BMR) 2002 1945
Sedentary 2402 2334
Lightly 2753 2674
Moderately 3103 3014
Very 3453 3355
Extremely 3804 3695

GayGeek is Sedentary. He has worked out 0 days in the past week ( of physical activity), and averaged 0 days () per week over the past month. (Click to see The CDC's guidelines on minimal physical activity per week.)

To lose 1 pound/week GayGeek would need to consume approximately 500 fewer calories per day than the numbers highlighted above.

And remember those are average numbers. GayGeek may not be average. It all depends on his genetics and whether he's got a fast metabolism or a slow one. But the numbers should be at least close to reality for most people. But the big take-away is that the more you exercise, the more you can eat (or the faster you can lose weight).

The Mifflin St Jeor equation takes age and gender into consideration, but not body composition (like the Harris-Benedict Formula before it). This is a problem because it takes three times the calories to maintain muscle than it does fat. So the Mifflin St Jeor numbers are probably best suited to people with average builds. In contrast the Katch-McArdle Formula does take body composition into consideration, but don't take age or gender into consideration. There is also the Cunningham formula which we show for people with fit/althetic bodies – since that is who the formula is designed for. (see Wikipedia)